Everybody is the Creative Type (and HMW use dt as a methodology for curriculum design?)

Today with Creative Confidence

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I am embracing the idea that creative confidence is a “way of seeing . . . your place in the world more clearly, unclouded by anxiety and doubt.”   With this way of seeing as my foundation and relying on my creative mindset of “a powerful force for looking beyond status quo,” I am now thinking about how to engage my creative energy during my summer of intentionality.   During my summer of intentionality, I am laying out goals for the work I want to accomplish and tracking my progress for meeting these goals.

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This approach I hope will allow me to return to school rested, without the underlying anxiety that I did not “do enough” or “think enough” about the 2018-2019 school year.

It was then invigorating to read that what keeps us from being courageous, from cultivating our creative confidence, is that there is paradoxically comfort in our uncertainty.  Shaking away the uncertainty, I have decided to work through this text as my way of challenging the status quo of course/curriculum design. (And I am deliberately not researching this idea because I don’t want to feed my fixed mindset of thinking that someone has already done this — proposed how to use Design Thinking for curriculum development.)

So what happens when we thinking about DT as a curriculum design methodology?  Do we combine it with the ideas of IBL and UbD?

The Kelleys see innovative programs as balancing three factors:  feasibility, viability, and desirability.  Finding the sweet spot in this triad is where design thinking works and finding it in curriculum design can be where students learn best.  For me, when thinking about design as curriculum design methodology, I see feasibility in education as a reminder for teachers to consider what we already know and believe about child development and pedagogy.  Will what we are proposing fit in what we know about how students learn?  Thinking about viability in education, we remember that our courses must live within the framework define our school’s mission and norms.  Will this course design support our mission and fit into our school’s culture?  Finally, desirability in education connects this methodology to Inquiry-based learning as we seek to connect our design to what student passion.  How do we learn what students hold as their core beliefs and how to leverage these beliefs for motivation?  In learner-centered design, we look for students to engage with content and skills that they feel are critical for success. Are these the same as what we as teachers feel are necessary?  And if not, do we let go of our own beliefs or do we encourage students to consider our ideas?  If so, how do we encourage students to look beyond themselves?

Using design thinking within the classroom as a methodology for inquiry-based learning is an authentic way engage students in innovative, interdisciplinary problem-solving.  This month I will explore how I can use design thinking within a curriculum development methodology to design a six-week course module focused on Shakespeare and Ellison’s Invisible Man.

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